Energy Issues


ReliabilityFor the past several decades, there were legitimate questions surrounding the ability of renewables to scale up and meet a substantial amount of our energy needs. But as the technology improved, output increased and generation became more reliable. Renewables are now being deployed at a rate that would have been unthinkable just a few years ago.

16.73% of U.S. electricity generation capacity now comes from renewable sources, and renewables were responsible for nearly half of the generation capacity added to the U.S. grid last year.1
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, January 2015
And many states can boast a significant reliance on renewables already – California, the 2nd most energy intensive state in the country,2
U.S. Energy Information Administration, July 2014
already gets 30% of its electricity from renewables.3
American Council On Renewable Energy, September 2014
Both Washington and Oregon get over 75% of their electricity from clean energy, most of it from hydropower.

The uptick in renewable energy deployment is thanks in some part to the rise of utility-scale installations. Large-scale wind farms have popped up across the country, including the world’s largest onshore wind farm, a 1.3 GW installation in California.4
California Energy Commission
And the Department of Energy loan guarantee program has helped make the U.S. the home of several of the largest solar installations in the world.5
U.S. Department of Energy, February 2015

Improvements in grid management and the increasing cost-effectiveness of electricity storage are two of the biggest reasons for the increased reliability of renewables, and those trends show no sign of slowing down.

  Jul 20, 2015  |    Des Moines Register, July 2015

  Jun 18, 2015  |    REN21, June 2015

  Jun 18, 2015  |    International Energy Agency, April 2011

  Apr 28, 2015  |    U.S. Department of Energy, April 2015

  Apr 23, 2015  |    Reno Gazette-Journal, April 2014

  Apr 23, 2015  |    Chicago Tribune, April 2015

  Sep 04, 2014  |    The Hill

  Sep 02, 2014  |    Washington Examiner

  Aug 20, 2014  |    NBC

  Aug 19, 2014  |    U.S. Department of Energy

  Aug 11, 2014  |    USA Today

  Aug 06, 2014  |    Environment Pennsylvania

  Jul 30, 2014  |    Christian Science Monitor

  Jul 11, 2014  |    KTVZ

  Jul 09, 2014  |    ACORE

  Jul 07, 2014  |    Energy Recovery Council



  Jan 24, 2015

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